Contact: +91 9889847979
Email: peri.org.info@gmail.com
Plants and Environment

E-ISSN: 2582-3744
Journal is inviting manuscripts for its coming issue. Contact us for more details.

2020, Vol. 2, Issue 4

Impacts of climate change on human and plant nutrition and health


Author(s): M. S. Adiaha* and C. S. Adiaha

Affiliation: *Department of Planning Research Extension & Statistics (PRES), Nigeria Institute of Soil Science (NISS), Nigeria

Abstract: The impact of climate change on our life is felt worldwide. Rising atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations, temperature extremes, changes in precipitation, increases in the frequency and density of weather events, and rising sea levels confer severe direct and indirect impacts on human health. The rapid flooding, intensive drought, unpredictable heat-waves including rapid wildfire outbreak has been on the increase exacerbating various chronic diseases and intensifying global cardiovascular heat-stress. Indirect health impacts of climate change may be long-term and might progressively lead to behavioural changes. The field survey was carried out in Calabar and Obubra, where anthropometric measurement of children under five (5) years were carried out. Soil-pant visual assessment for soil-plant nutrition and health was carried out in both Obubra and Calabar. Correlation statistics and analysis of variance (ANOVA) were used to analyze field data. Result of the field survey indicated that climate change can statistically (P˃0.05) damage plant-human health and nutrition. Result analysis output indicated that there exist a relation between human-soil health/nutrition and climate change. A climatic percentage analysis relationship indicated that human nutrition/health has a (% Relationship = 77.59), plant-soil health interaction (% Relationship = 63.34) which indicated that the climatic system has a strong influence on human-plant-soil survival and sustainability. Findings of the study revealed variation in climatic element of rainfall, temperature and relative humidity of Obubra and Calabar. The study encourages mineral fertilizer application including application of organic amendment, as a targeted strategy for soil improvement to reduce malnutrition. Further aggressive implementation of scientific and traditional strategy and approaches that will enable CO2 and other greenhouse gas emission reduction have been advice for human-soil-crop health and nutrition sustainability.

DOI: 10.22271/2582-3744.2020.dec.126

Pages: 126-137 | Views: 132 | Downloads: 96

Download Full Article: Click Here
00048419